Data Strategy

August 8, 2007

Early results on Google’s personalized search

Filed under: Information Retrieval, Personalization, Privacy, Search — chucklam @ 4:29 pm

Read/WriteWeb has a couple interesting posts on Google’s personalized search. One is a primer written by Greg Linden. In the primer, Greg explains what personalized search is, the motivation for it, Google’s personalization technology from its Kaltix acquisition, and other approaches to personalization. I agree with one of the commenters that Kaltix’s technology probably play only a small role in Google’s personalized search today, as that technology was invented many years ago.

The other post on Read/WriteWeb discusses the finding of a poll in which R/WW asks their readers how effective is Google’s personalized search. Their conclusion is that it is quite underwhelming. 48% “haven’t noticed any difference.” Although 12% claim their “search results have definitely improved,” 9% think their search results “have gotten worse.”

I would venture to guess that R/WW readers are more Web savvy and use search engines more often than the average person. Thus Google would have a lot more data about them and give them the most personalized results. (Yes, it’s only a conjecture. They may in fact be so savvy that they use anonymizing proxies, multiple search engines, etc.) If that’s the case, then even more than 48% of the general population wouldn’t “notice any difference” as Google would not be as aggressive in giving them personalized results.

Google has historically justified the storage of personal information as a necessity to providing personalized services. If they’re unable to demonstrate significant benefits from personalization, then there’s more ammunition to privacy advocates for restricting Google’s data collection practices.

As a user I’m not impressed with Google’s personalized search, and I think the use cases for personalized search that Google and others have talked about are usually too contrived anyways, but I believe it’s still too early to jump to conclusion. Like most R/WW readers, I’m quite savvy with search. I’m pretty good at specifying queries to find what I’m looking for. (And search results that I’m not happy with are almost never due to a lack of personalization.) I know I should search for ‘java indonesia’ if I want to find out about the island and ‘java sdk’ if I’m looking for the Java development kit. If I live in Texas, I won’t necessarily be impressed if searching for ‘paris’ gives me results for Paris, Texas instead of Paris in France. Of course, that’s just me. Other people may be different… or may be they’re not.

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